Document Type

Article

Journal Title

PLoS One

Publication Date

2017

Volume

12

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recommendations for vitamin D supplementation for preterm infants span a wide range of doses. Response to vitamin D supplementation and impact on outcomes in preterm infants is not well understood.

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate serum 25(OH)D3 concentration changes after 4 weeks in response to two different doses of vitamin D3 supplementation in a population of premature infants and quantify the impact on NICU outcomes.

DESIGN: 32 infants born at 24-32 weeks gestation were prospectively randomized to receive 400 or 800 IU/day vitamin D3 supplementation. Serum 25(OH)D3 levels were measured every 4 weeks. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare serum levels of 25(OH)D3 at 4 weeks and each subsequent time point. A p-value of

RESULTS: Serum 25(OH)D3 levels at birth were 41.9 and 42.9 nmol/l for infants in the 400 IU group and 800 IU group, respectively (p = 0.86). Cord 25(OH)D3 concentrations significantly correlated with gestational age (r = 0.40, p = 0.04). After 4 weeks of D3 supplementation, median 25(OH)D3 levels increased in both groups (84.6vs. 105.3 nmol/l for 400 vs. 800 IU/day respectively, with significantly more improvement in the higher dose (p = 0.048). Infants in the 400 IU group were significantly more likely to have dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) bone density measurements(56% vs 16%, p = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS: Improvement in 25(OH)D3 levels at 4 weeks, bone density, and trends towards improvement in linear growth support consideration of a daily dose of 800 IU of vitamin D for infantsNICU.

MeSH Headings

Absorptiometry, Photon, Bone Density, Calcifediol, Child, Dietary Supplements, Drug Administration Schedule, Drug Dosage Calculations, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Intensive Care Units, Neonatal, Male, Pregnancy, Prospective Studies, Treatment Outcome

ISSN

1932-6203

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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